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In booming industries such as e-commerce, marketing, social media or IT in general you hear a lot about quality and how to make it sustainable. Experts can argue for hours why they just found the right way of quality assurance to make their particular business more reliable and therefore sustainable. One fundamental question will most likely not be answered during all these business discussions and debates: What is quality? What do these business people mean when they talk about quality? What is their own expectation and standard of quality? These questions can be asked in almost any environment - personal life, business, sports. For every person you ask about a "definition" for quality you will get at least one answer.

You walk into a dive shop and are treated like a king. People start talking to you about your goals, your experience and where you would like to go in diving. They tell you that there is dive training you could do with them or you could just go diving with them to get more experience. Obviously they know what expressions like customer satisfaction and profitable diving operation mean. Next time you are in the same spot you will walk into the exact same dive shop with a huge smile to find out that nobody cares about you, all the dive guides and instructors you knew left and the "spirit" is gone. This is an obvious sign of "management by staff" - it's not the dive shop management that runs the show but the dive staff. If you are lucky enough to have a good bunch of people working together in the same diving operation it all works out but as soon as some key players leave the whole diving organisation is going sideways.

A diving operation works like any other business – apart from the fact that you get to dive and give people an exclusive insight in the underwater world. Once your diving operation is successful in delivering quality diving everyone will be happy. To en sure the quality of the diving operation stays on this high level checks have to be performed. The staff of the diving operation has to be aware that the one thing that is ensuring their income are satisfied customers who return to dive with such a quality diving operation.

To ensure you stay on top of your game and will be running a profitable and successful diving business you need working processes. These processes generally start with the first contact of a possible guest or a travel agency. Besides working as dive guide or dive instructor we as Quality-Diving focus strongly on the business aspects of diving and provide a wide range of services in this business area. In this article we try to give you a rough overview of steps and processes within a diving adventure of a customer. The view on these business processes are always described from the diving operations point of view. Thanks to our extensive knowledge in various industries we gained tremendous knowledge in optimising and aligning processes in different business situations.

Almost everyone at one stage in his or her life has had an idea like "let's start a band!" or "I will start my own business!". Most ideas are great and could work if put into action with thorough planning. The same goes for facilities in the diving business. It sounds easy and yet it is so hard to get profitable and successful diving business up and running. You just got back from an amazing dive trip somewhere in the Maldives, Indonesia or South Africa and can't help thinking of starting your own diving business and start a career for in the diving industry. A few weeks go by and you remember the good times you had on that diving trip. This is the moment when you realise: "I have to try it! I have to open my own dive shop and get into the diving industry - the diving business was waiting just for me to realise it!"